How to Properly Measure for a New Door

Installing a new door might seem a little daunting, particularly if you’ve never done it before. By far the most important thing to think about however, is how to measure for it.

Let’s run through the process of measuring for a new door.

tape measure

Measuring the frame

It might be tempting to measure the door you already have in place. After all, if that fits, then surely your new one will, too?

Unfortunately, it’s not quite that simple.

Over its lifespan, an old timber door will warp. It’s far better to measure the frame into which your new door will be installed, instead.

If you’re going to be fitting an entirely new frame, then you will want to double check its size. Most frames will fit standard door sizes, which will help cut costs, but if you’re after something bespoke, then you’ll need to be extra precise.

Before you get started, you’ll need a tape measure.

Step 1: Measuring the height of a door

First, measure the height of the opening in three places: the left, right and middle of the door. These three measurements should be within ten millimetres of one another, or else the entire frame will need to be swapped out. You’ll want to use the shortest of these three lengths; that way you can be sure that the door will open and close properly.

When making these measurements, be sure to account for the height of the carpet, doormats or any other obstacles. That way you’ll be sure that the door can swing freely.

Step 2: Measuring the width of a door

Next, it’s time to measure the door’s width. You’ll do this in much the same way, except horizontally along the bottom, middle, and top of the frame. Use the shortest of the three measurements to determine the maximum size of the door.

Step 3: Measuring the depth of a door

The final step in measuring a door opening is the depth of the door. Internal doors typically come in three different thicknesses, the most common of which is 35mm (although thicker insulating and fire doors might be 40mm or 44mm). Measure at various points along the interior of the frame to be sure of which you need.

Window Dressing Bi-Fold Doors

Bi-fold doors are a popular choice for homeowners looking to maximise light and space in their home, but dressing them can sometimes pose a challenge.

A bi-fold door consists of several panels arranged in a row.  Each is connected to the door next to it via a set of hinges, so that the entire arrangement folds in a concertina.  This means that when opened, the doors won’t intrude on the surrounding space.  You’ll find bi-fold doors on the exterior of properties, typically opening out onto the garden and patio, but you’ll also find them in the interiors of properties, often bridging kitchens, dining rooms and lounges.

Bi-Fold Doors:  Blinds or Curtains?

The complex folding nature of the bi-fold door can mean dressing them is a little trickier than dressing a standard window, but it is easier than you might think.

Dressing bi-fold doors with curtains

Curtains are a popular choice for bi-fold doors, but they pose a few problems, most of which concern space.  If your door is very tall, there might not be enough space at the top of the door to accommodate a curtain pole, which automatically rules out the possibility of dressing your bi-fold doors with curtains.

What’s more, since bi-fold doors often cover a vast expanse of wall, you’ll need a lot of curtain to cover them, and large curtains can be very heavy.  If you’re installing curtains on bi-folds in a lounge, then you might opt for heavy, blackout-style curtains, which will emphasise the problem further.

There are two problems here.

Firstly, curtains over a certain weight tend to sag.  Secondly, the heavier the curtains the more robust a curtain rail you’re going to need to hold them in place. This can bump up costs significantly.

To help mitigate this problem you might choose to opt for a lighter fabric.  Muslin or voile curtains are unobtrusive and can look spectacular, even if they aren’t quite as effective at excluding light and sound, or retaining heat, as thicker curtains.

Dressing bi-fold doors with blinds

home-interior-1748936_960_720

For the reasons listed above, blinds are often a better choice than curtains for dressing bi-fold doors, but how suitable are blinds for bi-fold doors? That depends on their type.

Roman blinds are designed to scoop up when not in use.  This means you’ll need to leave a little bit of space at the top of the door, much like curtain rails.  Roman blinds tend to be quite heavy, which could cause a problem when lifting them to the top of the door.  You can overcome this issue however by fitting a mechanised, electric retraction device – but needless to say this will add considerably to the cost.

Roller blinds suffer from much the same problem, albeit to a lesser degree; they collapse into a cylinder which takes up a little bit of room.

They’re also much lighter and often elasticated, which makes it really easy to retract them.  Venetian blinds offer similar benefits, as well as a unique aesthetic that’s proven consistently popular over the years.

Also worth considering are vertical panel blinds. Vertical blinds function more-or-less like curtains, opening from one or both sides.  Their only downside is their appearance. They can look distinctly “office-like”, which might not be desirable, especially when contrasted with a homely interior.

A problem both curtains and blinds share when fitted to bi-fold doors is what happens when the doors fold.

As they fold, they expand, which may intersect the dressing.  This means you’ll need to draw a set of curtains or vertical blinds entirely before you’re able to open the door.

Bi-fold doors with built-in blinds solve this problem.  They’re slightly more expensive, more difficult to personalise, and there are fewer of them to choose from – but they offer a clean, elegant solution that’ll suit many interiors.

So What Should You Choose for Your Bi-Fold Doors: Curtains or Blinds?

There is no one ideal solution so before you decide, consider the following factors…

Cost

The size of your bi-fold doors will affect how much it costs to dress them – but this is true of both curtains and blinds.  Of the available options, roman blinds tend to be the cheapest, but to get the best from them, you’ll need to equip them with an expensive motor.  If you’re replacing one set of curtains with another, then sticking with what you already have will minimise the costs associated with installing new rails and other hardware.

Privacy

Few of us enjoy living in in a goldfish bowl at night-time, so the main purpose of window dressing – besides decoration – is privacy.

Both curtains and blinds should perform equally here, but if you want to be extra sure no-can see what you’re up to once the sun goes down, a thick set of blackout curtains are probably your best option.

Light

One of the best things about bi-folding doors is how much light they let into the home.  A heavy set of curtains, however, will reduce this.  Even when they’re fully open, they’ll still be covering some of the window, and limiting how much light the doors let in.

Practicality

The amount of space at the top of your doors can make-or-break your decision.  If there isn’t enough space to fit a curtain rail, you’ll need to consider blinds instead.

Nicknames for Buildings Around the World, Illustrated

Today, iconic new buildings are likely to be as well-known (or in many cases, better known) for their nicknames, as they are for their design. In fact, it seems that as soon as work on a new building wraps up (and often before), the race to get a nickname that sticks is on.

Below is a series of illustrated postcards that depict some of the world’s most widely-recognised buildings as they are best known – by their nicknames.

the armadillo glasgow illustrated

Designed to extend the capacity of the SECC complex, this distinctive building in Glasgow was originally known as the Clyde Auditorium. However, it fast became so widely known as “The Armadillo” that its name was eventually changed.

the bathtub amsterdam illustrated

The delayed and vastly over budget Stedelijk Museum earned its nickname “The Bathtub” long before completion, and it’s easy to see why – this unusual construction bears more than a passing resemblance to a 100,000 square foot bath. Saying that, nobody’s really sure why. Mels Crouwel – Stedelijk’s lead architect – states the design is a “nod to the old Stedelijk’s white rooms”, but that answer does little to explain its uncanny likeness to a bathtub.

the batman building nashville illustrated

Completed in 1994, the 33 storey AT&T building in Nashville is not only the tallest building in the city; it’s the tallest building in the whole state of Tennessee. It earned the nickname “The Batman Building” thanks to its unmistakable resemblance to Batman’s mask.

the beehive new zealand illustrated

Few people hold the 60s and 70s in high regard when it comes to architecture. In fact, buildings from the period are frequently reviled, and are pulled down and replaced almost as often. New Zealand’s Beehive might be an exception. Originally conceived in 1964, the construction itself didn’t start until 1969. It was then built in stages until it was finally completed 10 years later, in 1979. Serving as the Executive Wing of the New Zealand Parliament buildings, the Beehive gained its name thanks to its shape, which is akin to a type of beehive known as a “skep”.

the cheesegrater london illustrated

The Leadenhall Building offers 48 floors of commercial space in the heart of London’s financial district. Completed in 2014 it gained the nickname the Cheesegrater when the City of London Corporation’s chief planning officer, Peter Rees, saw the model of the building and told its designer that he could “imagine his wife using it to grate Parmesan”.

the gherkin london illustrated

Another distinctive work of architecture in London’s financial district, in 2015 the Gherkin (formerly known as the Swiss Re Tower) secured the accolade of being the UK’s most recognisable building nickname. The building is home to 33 floors of offices but is also open to the public, housing a number of venues at which you can eat, drink and enjoy the view.

the sponge boston illustrated

The Sponge is the unofficial name for Simmons Hall – a state-of-the-art halls of residence located on the grounds of MIT (The Massachusetts Institute of Technology). The sponge-like effect exists thanks to the thousands of two foot square windows that adorn the building and from a distance, create an effect not unlike the holes on a sponge – something that designer Steven Holl set out to do when he was commissioned to work on the building in 1999.

How to Adjust French Doors

French doors that don’t close properly can cause a number of problems.

French doors that drag along the ground can damage the floor, and the door itself.  French doors with gaps, even very small ones, will cause draughts and pose a security risk.

white external french doors

Fortunately, most issues of this sort can be corrected with the help of adjustable hinges. Your doors might already have them installed but if they don’t, they can be purchased relatively cheaply, and fitted with the help of a few tools.

You’ll need:

  • A screwdriver.
  • A spanner or Allen key.
  • The hinges.
  • Some cardboard.

You’ll also need a willing volunteer.

How to Fix Common French Door Problems

Let’s run through the process of fixing French doors that stick, step-by-step.

If you’re installing adjustable hinges

  1. Remove the hinges from your doors. There will be two of these per side.  Use your screwdriver to remove them.  Be sure that you have a friend to hand, as these doors can be heavy, and you don’t want them to fall over.
  2. Using the original screws, attach the adjustable hinges to the doors.
  3. Now comes the tricky part. Get your helper to hold the door level with the frame, and screw it into place.  To keep everything entirely level, you might need to place shims at the bottom of the door.  A few pieces of cardboard should do the job nicely.

Once the hinges are in place…

Now that you’re done, you’ll be able to make some actual adjustments.  A set of adjustable hinges will allow for several different sorts of modifications.

If your doors aren’t quite parallel with the surrounding frame, they’ll start to drag.  This is a leading cause of French doors that hit each other.  This misalignment will develop over time, thanks to gravity and the warping of the frame. You’ll need to adjust the corner bearings, which are to be found on the bottom hinge.  Remove the cover and turn the adjusting screw to lift and lower the leaf.

The gaps might well have appeared to the sides of your door, and in the middle, which will compromise thermal insulation.   Measure the gaps carefully and adjust the bearings accordingly, making small adjustments to the top and bottom alternately, to keep the door parallel to the frame.

When you’re making these adjustments, measure carefully and often.  It might only take half a turn of your Allen key to get the job done.  Once you’re done, give the door a few test swings to ensure that they’re working as they should.

It’s worth checking the alignment of your French doors every so often (twice a year or so should do it).  Once you’ve made these adjustments for the first time, regularly repeating the feat will be easy.  More importantly, it’ll save you a great deal of hassle in the long-term!

Prefinished vs. Unfinished Doors

If you’re shopping for a wooden door, you’ll need to choose between a door that’s been pre-finished at factory level, or one that arrives unfinished, so you can finish it according to your own tastes at home.  So, what’s the difference between prefinished and unfinished doors?

What are prefinished doors?

Prefinished doors come factory-finished, covered in multiple coats of paint or wood stain.  All you need to do is fit the doors – a process which takes a matter of minutes, if you know what you’re doing.

What are unfinished doors?

Unfinished doors, by contrast, are those which lack a finish, so you’ll have to apply one yourself.  This allows for maximum flexibility and helps cut costs at factory level.

What about primed doors?

If you can’t decide between prefinished or unfinished doors, it’s worth bearing in mind that there exists a happy medium between them – pre-primed doors.

Pre-primed doors arrive with a base coat of primer, onto which you can apply a layer or two of paint. Since primers don’t vary as much as top coats in colour, this eliminates some of the work without limiting your options.  Obviously, primer is only necessary if you’re painting your door – transparent wood treatments don’t require it.

Why choose a prefinished door?

Let’s consider the advantages of prefinished doors.  The most obvious is that you have very little work to do once the door (or doors) arrive.  Simply attach the hinges and screw it into the frame.  You’ll need just a handful of tools, and the help of a volunteer.

Why choose an unfinished door?

So what about the benefits of unfinished doors?

As we’ve mentioned, your doors will arrive sanded smooth, but without a final coat.  This approach will allow you the freedom to choose whatever finish you’d like – however outlandish it might be.  If you think that your living room will benefit from a bright-yellow matt-finished door, then you’ll want to start from a blank, unfinished canvas.  Similarly, if there are other doors in your home you’d like to match your new door to, unfinished is the way to go.

For those in search of a new DIY project to sink their teeth into, an unfinished door is probably the optimal choice.

So, should you choose a prefinished or unfinished door?

white prefinished door

Cost

You might assume that an unfinished door would be a wonderful way to cut costs.  Up front, this is the case; unfinished doors are indeed less expensive than finished doors – but that’s not the end of the story.

Factor in the time investment you’ll need to make, as well as the price of the paint itself, and the costs begin to mount (and that’s before you even contemplate any additional tools you might need, like belt-sanders and sawhorses).

You’ll also need to secure some old blankets to control the mess.

Prefinished hardwood requires that more money be spent on the actual door, and less on the labour involved in installing it.  In the case of unfinished hardwood, the opposite is true.  If you’re bringing in outside help, bear their motives in mind.  Since they make their money from the labour, the job will be more profitable for them, even if the cost to you is the same.  They might therefore advise you to go down the unfinished route, simply to create more work for themselves.

If you’re going to follow the DIY route, then it’s worth considering what might happen if you botch the job entirely.  You’ll probably need to start again from scratch – and that’s going to cost you.  As such, DIYers should probably stick to prefinished doors.

Durability

Prefinished hardwood tends to be far more resilient than unfinished hardwood.  While you might apply just two or three coats of paint at home, at the factory level they’re able to apply more than twice that, which will increase the durability of the door.

Ease

It should probably go without saying that a pre-finished door just makes life easier.

One factor that few consider is the mess that finishing a door will create.  To achieve a smooth finish, you’ll need to apply several layers of paint.  Each of these will need time to dry, so you’ll need to clear a space in your home for the doors to lay flat.  You’ll also need to sand the doors down slightly before each coat of paint is applied. This will invariably create quite a lot of sawdust.

Colour matching

If you’d like your door to precisely match the décor around it, you have very little choice – you’re probably going to need an unfinished door.  You’ll be able to choose any colour you like, so getting one that fits isn’t such a big ask.

So what’s best: a prefinished or unfinished door?

While it might seem like a cop out, there’s no set answer to the question of which is best – it’ll depend on your circumstances and personal preferences.

Customers with little DIY experience tend to underestimate the work involved in painting a door at home (or the cost of getting someone else to), as well as the upheaval such an undertaking will cause.  This is especially so if you’re painting several doors at once.  On the other hand, if you have your heart set on a particular colour or style that door-makers simply haven’t yet made available, an unfinished door might be the only way to proceed!

white internal bifold door

The Cost of Internal Bifold Doors

Internal bi-fold doors allow you to inject a little extra space and light into your interior.  They make excellent room-dividers, whether it’s to separate kitchens, livings rooms or dining areas.  One of their chief advantages is their tremendous size; they can be anywhere up to seven or eight metres long.  Naturally, this means that they vary considerably in price!

How Much Do Internal Bi-fold Doors Cost?

There are many factors which influence the price of internal bi-fold doors.

Size

Needless to say, the bigger the door, the more it will cost – both from the cost of the extra materials, and the cost of the labour involved in producing and installing the door.

Bi-folding doors are complex things.  While a traditional French door might consist of just two panels attached to a frame via hinges, a bi-fold door might contain six or more; each of which tether not only to their neighbours but also to a long rail, along which a carriage runs.

Size matters.  3-metre bi-fold doors cost, on average, around £800.  However, the number of panels will typically influence the cost of the door more than its actual size due to the cost of the bi-folding hardware.  For example, our 5+0 panel doors vary in size by almost two metres, but they each cost the same.

That’s the cost of the door itself covered – but what about the cost of installation?  If you need to enlarge or shrink the opening in your wall to accommodate your door, this can get expensive quickly, as skilled labourers will be required to complete the job.

Materials

Most quality internal bi-folds are made from timber, with aluminium and uPVC generally being the preserve of external bi-fold doors.  The cost of timber bi-fold doors will vary.  Engineered timber doors, which combine several different lengths of timber into a warp-resistant whole, are the standard – but you might cut costs by going for something less prestigious.  When considering materials, bear in mind that inferior materials will not hold their shape, nor their value, and they’ll require more regular maintenance.

Glazing

Part of the charm of a large, folding door, is that it’ll introduce more glass into the room.  More glass leads to a greater sense of space, and more light dispersal through your home.  The more glazing you use, the more the door will cost – though other factors tend to be more influential.

Finish

Getting the door fully-finished at factory level will cost a little bit more, but it’ll save you the trouble of having to finish the door yourself.  Factory finishes tend to be more resilient than those you might apply at home, so they’ll save you the long-term cost of touching up your door each time something knocks against it.  On the other hand, if you’d like to get the job done yourself in a particular way, applying the finish yourself is the only way to proceed!

IDEAL DAY vs REAL DAY title

The Ideal Day vs The Real Day

Many of us wake up each morning with a vision of our “ideal” day. We mean to eat healthy food (just not too much of it). We plan to get at least half an hour’s exercise.  We intend to fill our evening catching up with friends or family or doing something to “expand our mind”, like reading a book, or binge-watching documentaries.

In reality our good intentions tend to fall by the wayside from the moment we start pressing the snooze button and get up half an hour later than intended. The salad we planned to prepare for lunch gets swapped for a supermarket meal deal and our nutritional powerhouse breakfast of eggs and avocado, or porridge and fruit, gets passed up for the donut we grab as we’re dashing out the door. And don’t get us started on the cake we chomped on at 3pm – it was a colleague’s birthday/someone baked it /it was 50% off (delete as appropriate) – it’d be rude not to.

Of course this doesn’t matter since we’ll work it off later jogging or in the gym, right? Well, that’s the plan, until 5 o’clock rolls around and the sofa seems so much more appealing that sweating it out on a treadmill. But it’s okay, we’ll make the most of our downtime. We’ll call a friend we’ve not spoken to for a while for a catch up and then we’ll get stuck into that book we’ve been meaning to get started on. Or we will, just as soon as we’ve watched this cat video, it looks like a good one…

…feel familiar?

IDEAL DAY vs REAL DAY optimised

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Movie Buildings in the Real World

Movie Buildings in the Real World

If iconic movie buildings were real, where would they be? See if you can guess both the movie and the real-world location.

Cinderella’s Castle 

Cinderella’s Castle was inspired by old Bavarian and eastern European architecture like Neuschwanstein, a fairytale-esque castle that sits on a hill above the Bavarian village of Hohenschwangau, and the Church of Mother of God before Týn, in Prague’s old town. It makes sense then that the real Cinderella’s Castle would sit in one of these locations, and we think it looks right at home at the end of the medieval Charles Bridge, in Prague.

(Tap the image to discover more!)

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Mos Eisely

The Mos Eisely scenes in Star Wars were filmed in Tunisia, a desert location that clearly influenced the set design. Here, however, we’ve placed the structures in Giza, to contrast the humble Tatooine huts against the spectacular Egyptian pyramids.

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Barad-dûr 

Look at London’s skyline and you might assume the city’s architecture had been inspired by Tolkien’s Middle Earth, and you wouldn’t be the only one. The similarities between The Shard and the black land of Mordor haven’t gone unnoticed, so where else would a real-world Barad-dûr (Sauron’s tower) reside but there?

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Yavin 4 Rebel Base 

Did you know that Central Park has 31 cameras covering its grounds? Yet the whole of the Bronx (at more than 40x its size) only has only 43? Neither did we. In what feels like a little bit of security mismanagement, the relatively peaceful Central Park is more closely guarded than the crime ridden Bronx. What better way to comment on this but with the inclusion of the guards that oversaw the protection of Yavin 4?

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Hogwarts School of Witchcraft & Wizardry

JK Rowling made Edinburgh her home while writing the Harry Potter series, and as a result many of her wizarding world’s most iconic landmarks and locations were inspired by the city. What better place for a real-life Hogwarts School of Witchcraft & Wizardry then, than amongst the cobbled streets of this ancient city, with its great castle looming over it from Castle Rock?

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Emerald City

The vast expanse of Russia’s Red Square with its colourful Cathedral is ideal as the backdrop for the bright lights of Oz’s Emerald City.

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Jedi Temple

Manhattan is often described as the “cultural, financial, media and entertainment capital of the world”, so where else would the central hub for all Jedi activities, the Jedi Temple, be located than amongst the high-rise architecture of the Big Apple?

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Atlantis

In The Spy Who Loved Me James bond investigated the hijacking of British and Russian submarines carrying nuclear warheads, and featured the now iconic Atlantic Citadel. Echoing the Battle of Sydney Harbour of 1942 in which the Japanese attacked using submarines, we decided to merge the fact and the fiction. The wave like curves of the Sydney Opera House and sea creature like structure of the citadel made for an aesthetically pleasing combination that supported similarity of fact and fiction.

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Derelict Alien Ship

With its rich history of ships, pirates, and the location of the world’s busiest container port, Shanghai seemed like a great place for the derelict commercial ship from the original Alien film. Weave into that some of the futuristic architecture that is dotted around the city – from the flying saucer like structure of the Shanghai Museum, to the glowing orb of the Oriental Art Centre – and you have a city that is both futuristic and connected to the past; the perfect complement to the design and feel of the original Alien film.

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Bates Motel

There is a camera shot in Hitchcock’s Psycho in which the viewer looks up at the foreboding structure of the Bates family home. Knowing the story and the fate that befell Norman’s mother gives what is a beautiful (fake) house its symbolic eeriness. The steps that lead up to that house reminded us of the immense structure of El Castillo at Chichen Itza, and the steps that are integral to the pyramid.  When you add in the Mayan culture of human sacrifice for the nourishment of the gods, you have a connection between the two that cannot be denied. Maybe that’s what Hitchcock was hinting at all along?

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Timber, Aluminium or PVC bifold doors?

Timber, Aluminium or PVC Bifolds

What material bifolding doors should you choose?

If you’re buying a set of bifolding patio doors for the first time, knowing how to decide which material to go for can seem like a bit of a mystery. The three options of timber, aluminium and PVC are all very different from each other, but no material ticks every single box so it’s a case of weighing up the pros and cons to find the best fit for your home. Luckily, we’re here to talk you through each potential material for your bifolds to help you make the right decision.

 

PVC Bifold Doors

PVC – or polyvinyl chloride if you’re feeling fancy – is a widely produced plastic that’s used to make a broad range of products from waste pipes to window frames. PVC is very cheap to manufacture and highly versatile, allowing it to be shaped into cross-sectional profiles with large air chambers that improve the insulation of your doors. Although most commonly supplied in white, it is possible to source PVC bifolds in almost any colour. While PVC is very easy to maintain, the plastic can unavoidably make the doors look like a budget option. It’s not a particularly strong material either, resulting in bifolding doors that can feel flimsy, which isn’t ideal in situations where structural stability is highly important.

PVC Pros:

  • Very cost effective
  • Decent thermal insulator
  • Low maintenance

PVC Cons:

  • Budget appearance
  • Low structural strength

 

Timber Bifold Doors

Wooden bifolds are the classic option amongst the three, and for good reason. Timber bifolds will look beautiful on any property, whether they’re finished with a stain to display the natural grain or painted a feature colour to compliment the rest of the house. Wood is also a fantastic natural insulator, while also being inherently strong. There are also options on the specific species used – Oak and Pine for example – to accommodate pretty much any budget. Old manufacturing methods used to leave the doors vulnerable to warping or bowing, but modern constructions are designed to resist these problems providing the doors are looked after. Maintenance is the main downside of timber bifolds, requiring a check over every 6 months or so and a quick touch up in the event of any finish deterioration.

Timber Pros:

  • Versatile appearance, premium feel
  • Options for all budgets
  • Good thermal insulator

Timber Cons:

  • Finish maintenance required
  • Failing to maintain the finish can result in problems such as bowing and splitting

 

Aluminium Bifold Doors

While aluminium bifolds are the newest option for homeowners, they’ve quickly established themselves and their presence continues to grow. Aluminium is both incredibly strong and relatively lightweight, making it a superb material for constructing bifolding doors out of. Its characteristic strength allows the framing around each pane of glass to be very slim, creating a sleek minimalist effect that had, up until recently, been reserved for bespoke architectural projects. It is also highly durable, requiring no maintenance of the finish and minimal upkeep needed for the rest of set. Aluminium bifolds tend to be supplied power coated in your choice of finish from RAL colour charts, giving you almost endless options. This all comes at a cost though; aluminium is by far the most expensive material out of the three due to the high costs involved in producing the metal itself. Also, being a metal, aluminium is a very poor insulator. Manufacturers limit the effects of this by incorporating thermal breaks – sections of a better insulating material – into the structure, but aluminium sets still depend heavily on the glass used to achieve acceptable insulation performance.

Aluminium Pros:

  • Structural strength
  • Slim sightlines
  • Wide range of finish options
  • Low maintenance

Aluminium Cons:

  • Most expensive option
  • Poor insulator

 

Conclusion

As you can see from our breakdown, each option definitely has its place. Although the positives and negatives of each material vary quite widely, this does mean that you should be able to find an ideal match, whatever your budget or the style of your project. Head over to our external bifold doors page to view the ranges we’ve currently got for sale, or give our office a call on 020 3744 0704 if you’d like any further advice.

Superheroes’ Super-Useful Washing Tips

What do washing symbols mean?

Unmasking the Illusive Washing Symbols

Fighting crime, saving the day and just generally being around to do some good is what being a superhero is all about, and of course, having an awesome costume to keep their top-secret identity hidden is essential.

So who better to save us from those pesky washing advice labels that are impossible to understand and tell you what washing symbols mean than our favourite ‘grime’ fighting superheroes?! Apart from our mums…

Do not iron washing symbol label

colour mixing washing symbol

wash at low temperatures washing label

Dry clean only washing symbol

Washing symbol meaning: check pockets before washing

Wash clothes inside-out washing symbol

hand-wash washing label symbol  mesh bag wash symbol

If you like these images, feel free to use them! Please provide a link of accreditation back to aspire-doors.co.uk

What Do Washing Symbols Mean?

This is a question that has gone unanswered since the start of time. Although it probably hasn’t been that long and we’re sure it might’ve been answered several times before, but we’ve all been there when we’re looking at the washing label and wondering to ourselves what they actually mean!

So we thought we’d pull in some help from our superhero friends to tell us what washing symbols mean… After all, that’s what superheroes are all about, right? Helping people out.

Aside from the ‘do not iron’ symbol, the rest of the laundry symbol meanings are pretty hard to figure out without a bit of help from a more experienced and better informed washer.

We hope that our superhero translations have helped you figure out what your washing symbols mean and next time you come to facing your arch-nemesis, the dreaded laundry pile, that you’ll have everything you need to save the day.