Folding doors

Different Door Styles, Finishes and Compositions Explained

There are many variables to doors. From the structure, to the style, to the finish, there are options at every stage of construction. Cost, appearance and customisation will all play a role in deciding which doors you need. This post will give you some guidance on the technical terms involved so that you can make an informed (and correct!) choice.

What Are the Different Cores and What Do They Mean?

The biggest difference between doors is the kind of core they have. This will affect how effective the door is at soundproofing and insulating, and has the biggest cost impact.

What is a Solid Core Door?

A solid core door has a thin veneer of higher quality wood, glued to a thicker piece of composite wood such as HDF or particle-board.

They are a good middle ground between solid doors and hollow core doors, so they share many of the benefits of the other two door types. They insulate quite well and provide good soundproofing qualities. The interior composite wood can also be treated to make it flame-retardant – most fire doors will be solid core.

What is a Solid Door?

A solid door is formed from solid slabs of wood, with no veneer or separate core. The type of wood used can differ, from hardwoods such as oak, to softwoods like pine.

Solid doors are the most robust type of door you can buy. Strong, secure and effective heat and sound insulators, solid doors are most often used as external doors. They should last a long time, even against the onslaught of the weather. Their main drawback, of course, is cost. They are very expensive in comparison to other door types, meaning they are impractical to use as internal doors.

What is a Hollow Core Door?

A hollow core door has a thin veneer of higher quality wood, just like a solid core door. They do have a core, but that core is made of paper or plastic (usually in a honeycomb pattern).

Hollow core doors are the most common choice for internal doors. They are lightweight, easy to fit, and affordable. This is usually the determining factor when you consider how many doors the average 3-bed house might need. However, this type of door can feel quite flimsy, and will not do a great job at insulating or soundproofing.

What Are the Different Styles of Internal Door?

Visually, the core of a door doesn’t make much difference. All doors can come in a range of styles. Here are a few of the most common styles you could choose between.

What is a Flush Door?

A flush door has a completely flat surface. Commonly, this style of door is used internally and has a hollow core. They are often painted, rather than stained, and have a contemporary, minimalist feel. For this reason, they are popular in modern properties and may look out of place amongst more traditional décors.

What is a Panel Door?

Panel doors are so-called because they have ‘panel’ shapes indented into their surface. These doors can be highly versatile, from the number of panels featured to the materials used in them. The panels do not have to be rigidly square shaped, and can feature glass panels or arch-shapes for more individuality.

This variety means you can find a panel door to match most interiors. From modern, minimalist to classic cottage, you will find a panel door that suits.

What is a Ledge Door?

A ledge door (also known as a cottage door) is made from full height vertical boards which are braced with horizontal rails across the length of the top, bottom and centre of the door. A good quality wood is often used to make these, and then simply stained or varnished to show it to its best advantage.

These doors are not particularly versatile but are beautifully rustic and make a perfect feature as part of a traditional country cottage décor.

What Are the Different Internal Door Finishes?

Once you’ve chosen the core of your door, and the style of your door, your final decision is what finish you want. There are three main finishes you can choose from, depending on how much work you personally want to put into perfecting your door.

Unfinished

An unfinished door will arrive sanded but otherwise untreated. It offers the most flexibility, as you can chose which products to use at every step of the painting process.

Primed

A primed door will have also been treated with an undercoat to minimise the work you have to do at home. They will be ready to paint from arrival and are a good middle ground if you want a door in a specific colour, with as little hassle as possible.

Find out how to paint a door here.

Pre-Finished, Finished, or Fully Finished

A finished door arrives ready to hang. It will have been treated with a primer undercoat, then painted, stained or varnished, depending on the look. It is the most expensive finish and is the least customisable, but it is easy and hassle-free.

Learn more about the differences between prefinished and unfinished doors here.

With so many variables involved, choosing a new door can be daunting. Now you should be better placed to make an informed decision to find doors that are as effective as they are attractive in your home.

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