Category Archives: Technical Tips

What’s the Difference Between a Door Lining and a Door Frame?

A lot of people think a door lining and door frame are the same thing, yet while this confusion is justified, it’s not quite true.

What is a Door Frame?

A door frame goes around an external door. It’s formed of two upright pieces and one overhead piece, as well as a stop moulded into a given position, and compressible seals around the outer edge. This ensures maximum exclusion of draughts and water. 

The word ‘frame’ also implies a structural element; it’s there to hold the surrounding wall aloft.

What is a Door Lining?

A door lining does a similar job to a door frame, except it’s for internal doors

Door linings come with movable door stoppers, which will allow you to adjust the depth at which your door closes. Door linings don’t come with seals, which is why they’re used for internal doors instead of external doors. You might also see door linings described as door ‘casing’. This means the same thing.

So, What’s the Difference Between a Door Lining and a Door Frame?

To summarise, a frame goes around an external door, while a lining goes around an internal door. 

That said, understanding the difference yourself won’t be much use unless you’re talking to people who also know the difference! Even professional joiners can get these terms confused. It’s worth clarifying exactly what you’re talking about before you commission any work, or make a purchase.

Left-Hand or Right-Hand Door? How to Tell the Difference

If you’re ordering a door that’s fitted with hinges (note that this isn’t an issue if you’re purchasing a door without hardware), it’s important that it arrives the right way around. While it’s possible to remove the hinges and re-insert them, it’s an extra hassle that you don’t need. So, before you click that buy button, you need to determine your door swing.

But that’s easy, right?

Well it is – but only once you know what to do.

Is a left-hand door one where the handle is on the left when the door’s closed? Or is it one that opens to the left?

To find out whether you have a left-hand or right-hand door:

  1. Open your door.
  2. Position yourself inside the door frame. 
  3. Put your back to the hinges. 

If the handle is on your left, it’s a left-hand door. If it’s on your right, it’s a right-hand door.

In other words, we’re describing the position of the hinges when the door is closed, and you’re looking at the door from the side that it’s opening away from. That’s why doors are divided into ‘right-hand hinge’ and ‘left-hand hinge’.

How to Replace a Door Jamb

Door jambs should last for decades before needing to be replaced, but of course, accidents happen. You may be able to fix a broken door jamb using wood-filler and a bit of sanding paper, but in some cases you might have to install a new door jamb.

Read on and we’ll walk you through how to replace a door jamb – just bear in mind that if you’re going to attempt this, you’ll want the help of a volunteer (especially if you’re attempting it for the first time).

Removing a Door Jamb

Before you do anything else, you’re going to need to remove the existing jamb. 

There’s no point in measuring yet – it’s better to measure the opening rather than the old jamb, as the smallest discrepancy can lead to a door that catches on the floor, or the door lining.  

Before getting started, you’ll need to assemble a few materials. 

You’ll need:

  • A flathead screwdriver
  • A crowbar
  • Allen key
  • Hammer
  • A tape measure

Step 1: Remove the door

You can’t remove the jamb while the door’s still in the frame. 

To remove the door, pull out the hinge pins and lift the door out of its frame. You can do this by tapping them up from below using a thin Allen key and a hammer.

Make sure to leave the hinges attached to the jamb.

Step 2: Remove the trim

To access the frame, you’ll need to get rid of the trim. Work your way around the edges using your crowbar. Don’t use too much force or you risk splitting the trim in half.

Step 3: Remove the jamb

Here’s where you take out the jamb itself. It’ll be attached to the frame, either with nails or screws. If it’s the latter, use your screwdriver (or a drill with a screwdriver bit attached) to work the screws loose. If it’s nailed in place, pull out the entire jamb with your crowbar. 

Again, don’t use too much force.

How to Measure a Door Jamb

Now that you’ve removed the old jamb, you’ll need a tape measure. 

You’ll be measuring vertically, from the floor to the exposed header. Ideally, you want the two lengths to be within a few millimetres of one another. A small discrepancy might not be noticeable; a larger one will need correcting.

Next, measure the location of the hinges. You can do this using the length of jamb you’ve preserved, measuring from the end of the jamb to the centre of each hinge. Take several measurements to be sure.

Fitting a Door Jamb

To fit your door jamb, secure it into position on the hinge side first. Use screws rather than nails, as this will make it easier to adjust the jamb later on. 

You’re going to need a spirit level and a few carpenter’s shims to get the jamb totally vertical. 

You can use a set-square to ensure everything is properly aligned, before securing the jamb in place. You can then repeat the process on the other side.

Lastly, you need to attach the hinges. 

There’s quite a lot of potential for error here, so make sure your measurements are accurate, and that your hinges are going to align properly with those on the door. 

It might be that your hinge-pins don’t slide in easily at first. To compensate for this, just use your hammer (or better yet, a mallet) to force them into place (just a little bit of force is all that it takes). 

This is where your volunteer is going to come in especially handy – they can hold the door up, while you to slide it into position and drop it into the hinges. 

What is a Mortice Lock?

While it might only be a few inches from end to end, the lock on your front door is arguably the most important security feature in your entire home. 

Locks come in several varieties, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. One you’ve probably heard about is the mortice lock. These earned their name thanks to the pocket (or mortice) that the bolt slots into, which is cut into the internal face of the doorframe. When the bolt is in the mortice, the door is unable to move, and so is locked. 

Let’s take a look at how mortice locks work, and whether one would be a good fit for your front door.

mortice lockHow do Mortice Locks Work?

A mortice lock relies on a relatively large mechanism, which slots into the interior of the door. This means that the door in question must be of a certain thickness, in order to accommodate the lock. 

Inside this mechanism is a space for the bolt to retreat into, as well as a series of parallel levers which are attached to the rear of the bolt via a small piece of metal called a bolt-stop.

The cut of the key is designed to match the levers on the interior of the matching lock. If the right key is used, then all of the levers align, and the whole mechanism can be rotated to withdraw and extend the bolt. If the wrong key is used, the key either won’t fit into the lock, or it won’t catch all of the levers in the right way.

A mortice lock will also incorporate several other components. These include the strike plate, and a piece of metal surrounding the mortice. This ensures that the bolt slots straight in, rather than scuffing against the surrounding wood. 

There’s also the faceplate, which is often a separate piece of metal that attaches to the door, facing the strike plate. Finally, the escutcheon plates sit around the handle to preserve the look of the door. It serves no function beyond aesthetics.

What Type of Doors are Mortice Locks For?

Mortice locks are primarily found on external doors. They can, however, also be used on internal doors to control who has access to certain parts of the house. You might do this if, for example, you’re running a bed-and-breakfast, or you’d like to keep garage doors under lock and key for security reasons.

What’s the Difference Between a Mortice Deadlock and a Mortice Sashlock?

Mortice locks come in a few different varieties, the most common being deadlocks and sashlocks. 

Deadlocks are the simplest. They only have a keyhole, and a bolt that goes back and forth. 

Sashlocks, on the other hand, feature a handle-operated latch mechanism. This means you can open and close the door without having to use the key, but can still lock the door when you leave the building.

Are Mortice Locks Secure?

Mortice locks are popular for a good reason – they offer excellent security and reliability. But some mortice locks are more secure than others. The more levers there are inside the mechanism, the more difficult the lock will be to pick. Those with five levers or more are generally considered to be the standard mortice lock for external doors – though three-lever locks are cheaper to produce and buy, making them a good choice for internal doors. 

You can also buy seven-lever mortice locks, which are somewhat more secure than five-lever mortice locks.

The main thing to look for is a mortice lock that’s compliant with the BS3621 standard or above. This basically certifies that the lock is sturdy enough that it can’t be dismantled from the outside. Specifically, it should last for five minutes when a tester tries to drill or cut through the bolt, and the bolt will need to extend two centimetres into the mortice. Another thing to look for is the British Standard kitemark, which is the industry’s mark of quality.

The Metropolitan Police recommend combining a mortice deadlock with a double-locking nightlatch, so you have some redundancy when it comes to security. That way, if one device fails, you’ll have another to fall back on. Other police services offer similar advice.

Rear and patio doors are often targeted by thieves, as the intruder doesn’t have to try and gain entry in view of the street. These sorts of doors are generally supplied as a single unit that can’t be modified with additional locks. Modern patio doors are far more substantial than those of yesteryear, so if this is a concern, you might want to upgrade your French, sliding, or bi-fold doors.

So Should You Buy a Mortice Lock?

A mortice lock is a standard across the country, thanks to a robust and resilient design that’s stood the test of time. While the internal mechanisms will be of interest to engineers, most of us only think about our mortice locks when they stop working. Invest in one that’s of the required standard, however, and this is unlikely to happen! 

What is a Door Jamb?

Doors are pretty complicated pieces of machinery, comprising of multiple different parts – one of which is the ‘door jamb’.

Definition of a Door Jamb

Let’s start with a plain English definition of a door jamb: a door jamb consists of the posts which sit on either side of the door, forming the vertical portion of the frame.

annotated doorWhat’s the Difference Between a Door Jamb and Frame?

Simply put, the jamb is a specific part of the frame. It’s there to take the weight of the door, as well as help keep the rest of the frame square and stable. Your hinges are affixed to the jamb on one side of the door, while the bolt passes through the jamb on the other side.

Jambs aren’t just found on standard, single doors – they’re also part of sliding, folding, and double-doors, on which they serve much the same purpose.

The ‘plumbness’ of a jamb has a significant influence on the function of the door. Just a few degrees outside of 90°, and you’ll find that your door rubs against the frame, or that the bolt doesn’t properly align. If the surrounding walls aren’t entirely plumb, you can correct this with the help of a few strategically-placed shims.

It’s also crucial that the jambs are of the same height, and not too tall or too narrow – if so you might end up with excessive gaps (or no gaps at all).

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Storing Internal Doors

There may be times when you will need to store your internal doors for short periods. Old doors may need storing while you renovate or redecorate your house. New doors may be ordered in advance of installation, so you can ensure they are available as soon as you need them.

In either situation, you will need to store them carefully. This will prolong their life and keep them looking their best.

To help you get the best out of your doors, we have put together some advice on the correct way to store them.

Why Do I Need to Store My Doors Correctly?

When storing wooden doors, it’s important to keep them in the right conditions. If they are left in the wrong place, or left uncovered, they may become chipped or stained. If kept at the wrong temperature or humidity level, they could become warped. At best, these occurrences will diminish the visual quality of your doors and shorten their life span. At worst, they’ll become too warped or damaged to fit inside their frames, rendering them unfit for purpose.

How to Store Your Internal Doors

Store doors flat but off the ground

Doors are heavy and designed to distribute their weight evenly when hung. If you leave them leaning or upright on the floor for a prolonged period (more than a day) they will start to bend.

Keep your doors covered

Preferably in their original packaging, but otherwise with a light, soft cloth or sheet. This will help stop them getting dusty or marked.

Store doors away from direct sunlight

Any exposure to UV light could bleach the doors, and leave an uneven colour on their surface.

Keep doors somewhere dry

This means away from fresh plaster, rendering, or concrete. Unless completely dry, all these substances can add moisture to the air, which may affect the doors.

Do not place your doors near a heat source

Placing them near a radiator or other source of heat may cause the doors to ‘sweat’. This draws moisture out of the wood which can weaken it or make it bow.

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Guide to Trimming Hollow Core Doors

Do you know what type of doors you have in your house? Most likely, they’re hollow core doors, since these are the most popular internal doors in use today. Even so, the phrase ‘hollow core door’ may not mean anything to you.

Read on for more information on how hollow core doors are structured, the pros and cons of hollow core doors, as well as some tips on how to resize hollow core doors.

What is a Hollow Core Door?

Wooden doors come in three types: solid wood, solid core and hollow core.

As you would expect, solid wood doors are made from thick slabs of wood. They are strong, secure and are good insulators. They are also rather costly which makes them a natural choice for external doors.

Solid core doors have a thin veneer of high-quality natural wood fixed over a core of engineered wood, such as HDF.

Hollow core doors, contrary to their name, do not have an empty void at their centre. Instead they have a thick solid frame, and a core made of plastic or cardboard. This core is usually constructed in a hexagonal ‘honeycomb’ pattern; one of the strongest structures found in nature. This makes the doors more solid, robust, and soundproof.

Hollow core doors are lightweight, easy to fit and inexpensive, which makes them a popular choice for internal doors. They are also very versatile. This honeycomb core can be contained within a variety of veneers that can be matched to any decor. They can even be made to resemble far more expensive solid wood doors.

Why Might You Need to Trim Your Hollow Core Door?

There are a number of reasons you might want to trim a door. You might have an awkward door frame in a non-standard size that makes purchasing a new door incredibly difficult. You could estimate the size or even misread your tape measure. Mistakes do happen, and can mean that when your new door turns up it’s an inch too tall for its frame.

You may even need to resize old doors. After installing a plush new carpet with a deep shaggy pile, you’ll probably notice your doors start to catch. The thicker the carpet, the more clearance it will need, but a new door might seem a daunting expense after replacing flooring.

Could it be quicker, cheaper and easier just to trim the existing doors instead?

Can Hollow Core Doors Be Trimmed?

The short answer is yes, hollow core doors can be trimmed.

Hollow core doors have a strong block outer frame, which leaves a couple of inches of solid wood at the top, bottom and sides of the door. When it comes to allowing for alterations, this frame makes them a lot more forgiving than you might think. This counts for the sides as well as the bottom and top of the door.

This answer does come with a ‘but’ though.

While it is possible to trim hollow core doors, it isn’t always advisable. Removing an inch or two to allow for a thicker carpet or misread tape measure is fine, but cut off too much and you may notice that the bottom of the door is no longer solid.

When this happens, the structural integrity of the door can be compromised. This can be fixed by reinserting a block from the bottom of the door, inside the veneer using glue. Though this may sound simple, it can be fiddly. There is a lot of potential for it to go wrong, leaving you with a door that is even more unsuitable than it was before. In general, it’s advisable to avoid going to these extremes.

That said, if all you’re looking to lose is a thin layer from your door, then read on for a quick guide on how to trim hollow core doors.

How to Trim a Hollow Core Door

What you need to trim hollow core doors:

  • Sheets or paper to protect the surface of the door
  • Tape measure
  • Masking tape
  • Guide wood
  • Utility knife
  • Jigsaw or circular saw

Instructions:

  1. Measure up

Measure how much you want to shave off the door. Make sure you measure the door frame in three places: both sides as well as the middle. This will give you the truest possible reading and minimises the risk of mistakes.

Remember, you only have about an inch and a half available to lose from the average hollow core door. If you need to take off more than that, think about replacing the door instead.

  1. Mark the door

Start by drawing a pencil line to show where you’re cutting, then grab a knife and a guide and score the surface of the door. This helps stop the door splintering when you start sawing it.

  1. Mask the door

Wrapping masking tape around the bottom of the door will also help prevent chipping or splintering. Another tip is to wrap the foot of a circular saw with tape, as this can protect the surface of the door from damage as well.

  1. Cut the door

The big moment. Use a guide and keep the saw steady to ensure a clean straight edge and minimise the risk to the door.

  1. Sand the door

Use a fine grit paper to smooth off any rough patches on the cut edge. A hand sander will obviously make this job quicker and easier, but try to be gentle and restrained, or you may wind up losing more height on the door.

  1. Finish

Obviously, what you do here will depend on the door’s appearance. You may need to repaint the bottom of the door, or simply stain and varnish it. Whichever way you need to finish your doors, ensure they are completely dry before you re-hang them. This will benefit your door and your carpet.

Trimming hollow core doors is possible, but not always easy. It can take a seasoned DIYer, particularly if you’re trying to lose a lot of width or height, and it can be intimidating if you don’t have the right tools. Hopefully this post will have helped you decide if it’s a task you are ready to tackle.

Folding doors

Different Door Styles, Finishes and Compositions Explained

There are many variables to doors. From the structure, to the style, to the finish, there are options at every stage of construction. Cost, appearance and customisation will all play a role in deciding which doors you need. This post will give you some guidance on the technical terms involved so that you can make an informed (and correct!) choice.

What Are the Different Cores and What Do They Mean?

The biggest difference between doors is the kind of core they have. This will affect how effective the door is at soundproofing and insulating, and has the biggest cost impact.

What is a Solid Core Door?

A solid core door has a thin veneer of higher quality wood, glued to a thicker piece of composite wood such as HDF or particle-board.

They are a good middle ground between solid doors and hollow core doors, so they share many of the benefits of the other two door types. They insulate quite well and provide good soundproofing qualities. The interior composite wood can also be treated to make it flame-retardant – most fire doors will be solid core.

What is a Solid Door?

A solid door is formed from solid slabs of wood, with no veneer or separate core. The type of wood used can differ, from hardwoods such as oak, to softwoods like pine.

Solid doors are the most robust type of door you can buy. Strong, secure and effective heat and sound insulators, solid doors are most often used as external doors. They should last a long time, even against the onslaught of the weather. Their main drawback, of course, is cost. They are very expensive in comparison to other door types, meaning they are impractical to use as internal doors.

What is a Hollow Core Door?

A hollow core door has a thin veneer of higher quality wood, just like a solid core door. They do have a core, but that core is made of paper or plastic (usually in a honeycomb pattern).

Hollow core doors are the most common choice for internal doors. They are lightweight, easy to fit, and affordable. This is usually the determining factor when you consider how many doors the average 3-bed house might need. However, this type of door can feel quite flimsy, and will not do a great job at insulating or soundproofing.

What Are the Different Styles of Internal Door?

Visually, the core of a door doesn’t make much difference. All doors can come in a range of styles. Here are a few of the most common styles you could choose between.

What is a Flush Door?

A flush door has a completely flat surface. Commonly, this style of door is used internally and has a hollow core. They are often painted, rather than stained, and have a contemporary, minimalist feel. For this reason, they are popular in modern properties and may look out of place amongst more traditional décors.

What is a Panel Door?

Panel doors are so-called because they have ‘panel’ shapes indented into their surface. These doors can be highly versatile, from the number of panels featured to the materials used in them. The panels do not have to be rigidly square shaped, and can feature glass panels or arch-shapes for more individuality.

This variety means you can find a panel door to match most interiors. From modern, minimalist to classic cottage, you will find a panel door that suits.

What is a Ledge Door?

A ledge door (also known as a cottage door) is made from full height vertical boards which are braced with horizontal rails across the length of the top, bottom and centre of the door. A good quality wood is often used to make these, and then simply stained or varnished to show it to its best advantage.

These doors are not particularly versatile but are beautifully rustic and make a perfect feature as part of a traditional country cottage décor.

What Are the Different Internal Door Finishes?

Once you’ve chosen the core of your door, and the style of your door, your final decision is what finish you want. There are three main finishes you can choose from, depending on how much work you personally want to put into perfecting your door.

Unfinished

An unfinished door will arrive sanded but otherwise untreated. It offers the most flexibility, as you can chose which products to use at every step of the painting process.

Primed

A primed door will have also been treated with an undercoat to minimise the work you have to do at home. They will be ready to paint from arrival and are a good middle ground if you want a door in a specific colour, with as little hassle as possible.

Find out how to paint a door here.

Pre-Finished, Finished, or Fully Finished

A finished door arrives ready to hang. It will have been treated with a primer undercoat, then painted, stained or varnished, depending on the look. It is the most expensive finish and is the least customisable, but it is easy and hassle-free.

Learn more about the differences between prefinished and unfinished doors here.

With so many variables involved, choosing a new door can be daunting. Now you should be better placed to make an informed decision to find doors that are as effective as they are attractive in your home.

Bi-Folding Doors and Traffic Doors

Bi-folding doors are perfect for opening up a living space. They’re formed of a concertina of panels that move as one along a single track. This means bi-folding doors can be manufactured to fill very large spaces, and as such they’re often used to bridge the gap between a living space and a garden.

Bi-fold doors come in several varieties. There are those that open from a single side. There are also so-called ‘French-Fold’ designs, which consist of two equal-sized groups of panels which meet in the middle. Finally there are those that consist of one large group of panels, and a single traffic door.

What is a Traffic Door?

A traffic door is a single, ordinary door positioned immediately next to a folding door, giving the impression of a single, cohesive unit. You should be able to spot the traffic door in the picture of our Aspect Grey Bifolding Doors below – it’s the one with the handle.

Aspect Grey Bifolding Doors

Most traffic doors are functionally identical to an ordinary single door, featuring a lever handle and a key cylinder. In some cases, they’re part of the bi-fold system itself, and are set within one of the central panels.

Why Might You Need a Traffic Door?

If you need access to your garden, a traditional folding door has some distinct disadvantages. There’s a reasonable amount of effort involved in opening and closing them, for starters. What’s more, this extra effort means they take longer to open and close. This is turn means that in winter, they’ll let lots of cold air into your home.

Thankfully there’s a simple solution – traffic doors.

Traffic doors allow you to enter and exit your home without having to pull open the full set of doors. You can even do this when the main doors are locked from the inside, allowing you to enjoy the benefits of a bi-fold without compromising on security.

During the height of summer, you might get away with leaving the door open all day. You won’t be able to do this in winter. Given that UK summers tend to last for just a few weekends (if that), and winters can last for what seems an eternity, the merits of a traffic door speak for themselves.

Do Bi-Fold Doors Always Need Traffic Doors?

In some cases, a traffic door isn’t required. If there’s another point of access to your garden in an adjacent room, then a traffic door isn’t really necessary. You might instead install a bigger folding door. If, on the other hand, the folding door is being regularly used for trips to the dustbin, or as the main point of entry to the home, a traffic door becomes pretty essential.

Generally, the larger the bi-folding doors, the less prominent a traffic door will be. This means that on very small bi-folds, you’ll find that the traffic door takes up a considerable amount of space. In fact, you couldn’t install a traffic door into a two panel folding door at all (this means you’d probably be better off fitting external French doors, instead).

Questions to Ask Before Buying a New Door

Doors impact the security, heat-efficiency and visual appeal of a building, and homeowners interact with them repeatedly, on a daily basis.

This means that before buying new doors, you should be sure to ask a few key questions in order to gather the information you need to make the best possible decision, and save yourself trouble further down the line.

Here are some of the most important questions to ask before buying a new door.

What Type of Doors Do I Need?

Doors come in several different types and needless to say, you’ll want to pick the one that’s best matched to your needs.

Am I buying an external or internal door?

external french doors

Aspect Grey French External Doors

This distinction is self-explanatory: internal doors separate the rooms inside your home; external doors separate your home from the outside world. The two do very different jobs, and as a result are constructed quite differently.

What material should the door be made from?

The material a door is made from will have a significant impact on its appearance and how it functions. Most interior doors are made at least partially from timber, but there are several different varieties of timber door to choose from.

A solid wooden door is made from the same material all the way through, which makes it more vulnerable to warping. A composite door, on the other hand, is formed from many different lengths of wood with grains that run in different directions. This helps reduce warping.

Exterior doors are commonly made from uPVC, timber, a composite of materials, or aluminium. The former (uPVC) is cheap and lightweight, while the latter (aluminium) is considerably more expensive.

What style should the door come in?

The style of door you choose is a matter of personal taste. You’ll want to pick something that you’re happy to look at, and that’ll match the rest of your décor. If you’re considering redecorating, then you’ll have the luxury of choosing a door and working the rest of your interior around it.

What type of door should I choose?

There are several types of door:

  • Single doors constitute the vast majority of doors in the UK. As the name suggests, they are formed of just one panel.
  • Double doors are effectively two single doors set into the same frame. French doors are a variety of double door.
  • Bi-fold doors consist of several panels that join together in a concertina, and run along a guide track. This design allows for the creation of very large room-dividing doors, and small ones which are used for storage spaces where there’s no room for a traditional single door to swing outward.
  • Sliding doors are made from panels set into a long track. They slide behind one another to create an opening.

Do I Need a Door or a Door-set?

You’ll have the choice of buying your doors as separate panels, or as complete sets including a frame and an architrave, with ironmongery pre-installed.

Buying everything separately will allow you to tailor the door to your exact requirements. You don’t need to be limited by what manufacturers think looks good – if you want to pair a specific handle with a specific door, you’ll be able to do it.

On the other hand, a door set will guarantee everything matches, and they’re easier to install. They work best with new openings, where you won’t have the cost of removing the old frame to consider. If you’re carrying out major renovations and are already bringing a carpenter on-site, it might make economic sense to bring in single doors – especially if you don’t want to rip out old frames without knowing exactly what you’re going to find underneath!

Do I Want Unfinished or Prefinished Doors?

Timber doors are sold either unfinished or prefinished. An unfinished door will allow you to apply the finish of your choice. A prefinished door, on the other hand, has been finished at factory level. This should mean that the finish is longer lasting and more resilient than what you would apply at home.

If you’re applying an opaque finish, you might consider a happy medium: doors that have been treated just with a primer. Since most primers are either white or black, you get a compromise between flexibility and convenience.

How Much Can I Afford to Spend on New Doors?

Doors vary considerably in price. A set of high-quality folding doors could easily cost in excess of a thousand pounds, while an affordable single door might cost less than a hundred. That said, there are hidden costs to consider.

Installation Costs

You might think to cut costs by opting for a disassembled door and putting everything together yourself. If done properly, this can indeed be a good way to save money, but then, it depends how valuable your time is. An improper installation might need to be professionally corrected, and in the case of external folding doors, might leave your home vulnerable to break ins.

Maintenance Costs

Timber doors will need to be periodically sanded and refinished to guard against water damage (and ensure that the door looks the part). This means investing in a pot of finish, brushes, sponges and sandpaper – as well as setting aside a weekend or two each year.

Have I taken correct measurements?

Before you make a purchase, you’ll need to be sure that your new doors will fit into the aperture you have in mind. You’ll find a quick guide to the measuring process here.

Do I need Fire Doors?

In some instances, you’ll need an interior door that’s a little more robust. Fire doors are thicker and more resilient than standard doors, and feature an expanding strip around the edges, that together serve to slow the spread of fire through your home. If a building is more than two storeys tall, then fire doors are usually required. This means tower blocks as well as loft conversions.

Fire doors cost slightly more than standard doors, but you might think it worthwhile if you’re installing them into sensitive areas like kitchens and garages.