The World’s Most Expensive Homes [Infographic]

Ever wondered what the most expensive houses around the world are and how much they go for? Wonder no more, as we’ve rounded up 10 of the most expensive houses the world has ever seen…

Worlds Most Expensive Houses

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Hearst’s Mansion – $95m

This house was made famous in ‘The Godfather’ in a scene in which a Hollywood movie producer awoke to find a severed horses head in bed with him.

This ‘mansion’ is actually four houses, an apartment and a cottage all together; totaling 29 bedrooms, along with a movie theater, a disco and much more. It was once the most expensive house on the US market at $165m.

Maison de l’Amitie  – $95m

The Maison de l’Amitie is perfect for if you need separate guest cottages for all of your visitors – because clearly 18 bedrooms and 15 bathrooms isn’t enough in the main house alone.

The owner of the property, Dmitry Rybolovlev – who also owns AS Monaco FC – had what is believed to be the most expensive divorce settlement in history, with Swiss courts ordering him to pay $4.5bn to his ex-wife.

Palo Alto Loire Chateau – $100m

This house became the first ‘single-family home’ in the US to sell for more than $100m. Does your single-family home have 14 bathrooms, a ballroom and a private car wash?

The owner of the property, Yuri Milner, is an investor in Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Groupon and lots of other highly successful online businesses, and is worth over $1.8bn.

One57 Penthouse – $100.5m

The One57 Penthouse features 23ft high ceilings, so can even accommodate basketball players. Along with this, it has glass curtain walls that offer a panoramic view of Central Park.

As well as having access to all of the Park Hyatt hotel amenities (which takes up the first 39 floors of the building), owners also have their own private amenities floor, complete with gym, pool, library and theater. Not too shabby.

Fleur de Lys – $125m

Along with a 24-karat gold trimmed interior, there is also a 50-seat home cinema and a host of museum-worthy furniture inside Fleur de Lys; including Napoleon’s favourite chair!

Franchuk Villa – $129m

This five story, 10-bedroom Victorian villa used to be an all-girls school until 1997.

In 2006, developers purchased the property for £20m, spent £10m on refurbishing it and then sold it on for £80m two years later. There can’t be too many houses in the world that have been sold for £50m profit within a couple of years, surely?

Bran Castle – $135m

Famous for once housing Vlad the Impaler – better know as Count Dracula – this not-so-homely castle is an extremely popular tourist destination, with over 500,000 people visiting every year.

One Hyde Park Penthouse – $214m

You might think that $214m would get you a house of total luxury, but apparently not – or at least it seems that way – based on the owner planning to spend upwards of $90m on further renovations.

What else could need to be renovated? It already has iris scanners, bulletproof windows, SAS Special Forces protection (seriously), private gyms, his-and-her studies…just the typical stuff you’d find in an everyday house, I guess.

Rutland Gate – $485m

Although appearing conservative from the outside, the Hariri mansion at Rutland Gate is the largest single-family home in the UK other than Buckingham Palace, with 45 bedrooms.

Antilia – $1bn

The Antilia home of Mukesh Ambani is technically 40-stories tall, with each room almost twice the height of a typical room.

Inside the house is a Hindu temple, health spas, yoga studios, swimming pools, gardens (inside!), a 168-car garage, three helipads (yes, three), a 50-seat movie studio and over 600 staff work at the property. At $1bn, it seems like a steal…

You can start your property’s journey to turning it into a palace by finishing it off with one of our exquisite external bifold doors.

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